sowny.net | The Southern Ontario/WNY Radio-TV Forum


You are not logged in. Would you like to login or register?

Fri Mar 23 11:04 am  #1


The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

In addition to the Gordon Sinclair CKVR article I posted earlier, comes this other item off the same page - a glimpse of what the Toronto radio dial looked like back in March 1958.

This was less than a year after CHUM switched to a Top 40 (actually 50) format. A few interesting things to note:

-CKEY was still at 580 - and still existed!

-CKTB was at 620.

-CHLO was at 680.

-CJBC was still English.

-There's a CJFB listed at 1090. These call letters are now assigned to an FM station in Barrie, but I think this was the forerunner to CKKW in Kitchener.

-What was CKGR at 1110?

-CKOX at 1340 came out of Woodstock

-CKFH was still at 1400

-CFJR in Brockville was listed on 1450. It's now an FM only.

-I'm not sure if CKCY at 1490 was what became CHYM in Kitchener. Does anyone know?

-And CHVC was on the air at 1600. They would eventually become CJRN and wind up moving up the dial to 710, before disappearing entirely.

On the FM side, what would be CKFM was then called CFRB-FM, CHML-FM was at 94.1, (now CBL-FM, formerly known as Radio 2,) WHLD-FM was on where WKSE currently sits, something called WBER-FM (maybe they meant WEBR?) is listed at two places on the dial, WBEN-FM (now WTSS) was at 106.5 and for some reason, they list WJR-FM Detroit which couldn't possibly have come in here. Or could it?

And by the way, I find it ironic that CBL-FM is listed as being at 99.1 - which of course is where Radio 1 is now, having moved there in a long drawn out battle for the frequency when CKO left the air. 
 
You can get a closer look at the listing here

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/808/40262341534_39723eb2c1_m.jpg

Last edited by RadioActive (Fri Mar 23 11:14 am)

 

Fri Mar 23 11:19 am  #2


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

RadioActive wrote:

-What was CKGR at 1110?

Oshawa. What's now CKDO, I think.
 

 

Fri Mar 23 11:25 am  #3


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

I believe CKCY was at 1400, but then moved to 920 in the early 60s,  out of "salt" ste marie.  The station operated until pelmorex shut it down '92-ish

Also, the Barrie station is CFJB, not CJFB as listed.

 

Fri Mar 23 11:30 am  #4


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

splunge wrote:

Also, the Barrie station is CFJB, not CJFB as listed.

Sorry, typos happen! Thanks for the correction. So what was CFJB at 1090? 

     Thread Starter
 

Fri Mar 23 11:37 am  #5


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

Here's what I found about CFJB AM 1090 onbroadcasting-history.ca It's now CIAO

Fenwick Job applied for an AM licence at Brampton, operating on 1090 kHz with power of 250 watts. The application was approved by the CBC. Job said his station would be a strictly local operation with news and music, running seven days a week - to be operational in mid-December. Fen Job was the former national sales manager of Toronto's CKEY and had recently taken over the weekly newspaper - The Peel Gazette. In the past, he had also worked for WHLS in Port Huron, Michigan, and Montreal's CJAD. Job would be station manager (managing director) and the majority shareholder. Deryk Upton was named commercial manager and Ross Millard, program director. Announcers would include Paul Delaney and Stan Larke.CFJB began broadcasting on December 23. It operated on a frequency of 1090 kHz with a daytime power of 250 watts (non-directional). CFJB was a daytime only station, the second one in Canada after CHUM Toronto. The single 146 foot tower was located on a site on part of the east half of Lot 10, Concession 2, west of Hurontario Street, Chingacousy Township, Peel County. CFJB was an independent station with no network affiliation. The licensee name was Broadcasting Station CFJB Ltd. The "FJ" in the call sign was for Fen Job, and the B was for Brampton.

Last edited by splunge (Fri Mar 23 11:38 am)

 

Fri Mar 23 11:55 am  #6


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

So it was the forerunner of what was to become CHIC in Brampton. Wow, I never knew that. Thanks for the info.

It says that Fenwick Job was killed in a car crash in 1959, which led to the sale of the station and eventually into the hands of the infamous Allen Bros.

We can only wonder what it might have become had the original founder lived.

     Thread Starter
 

Fri Mar 23 12:29 pm  #7


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

Hey RA. Here are a few more details to fill in the blanks. CKEY moved to 590 in Jan 1964. I have a Silver Dollar Survey for proof. CJBC went all French sometime in 1964 as well. CKFH moved to 1430 in 1960. CKGR at 1110 was in Galt. In 1956, they became CFTJ and moved to 1320 in the mid 70's then to 960 as CIAM. Now they are at 107.5 as CJDV DaveFM.  There was a CKCR at 1490 in Kitchener from 1941-76. Then the move to 570 and call letter flips. CKTB went to 610 in 1959 and CJRN went from 1600 to 710 in 1971. I remember getting two radios side by side to listen to the switch

 

Fri Mar 23 1:49 pm  #8


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

WBEN is listed at 950, but it had been at 930 since 1941.

WEBR-FM didn't sign on until 1960 and I can't find any reference to a WBER-FM in 1958. WEBR-FM is now WNED-FM.

Surprised they listed WJR-FM in Detroit. It doesn't seem possible that the signal could be heard in Toronto, but you never know.


"The radio craze ... will soon fade." - Thomas Edison, 1922
 

Fri Mar 23 2:03 pm  #9


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

The only thing I can figure about WJR-FM is that in those days, while the Star was a Toronto paper, it was sold in places like London, Ont. (although they don't list CFPL, which first went on air in 1922.) So maybe they were catering to fringe listeners who could pull in the signal. But you're right. I can see why they might have included WJR-AM but listing their FM signal on the guide is kind of odd.   

What this also reminds us is that the Star - and other papers - used to have a large section with daily radio listings. These days, if radio even gets mentioned in a story, it's a noteworthy event.

     Thread Starter
 

Fri Mar 23 9:09 pm  #10


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

I wonder why WKBW is not listed?


"The radio craze ... will soon fade." - Thomas Edison, 1922
 

Fri Mar 23 11:31 pm  #11


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

RadioActive wrote:

The only thing I can figure about WJR-FM is that in those days, while the Star was a Toronto paper, it was sold in places like London, Ont. (although they don't list CFPL, which first went on air in 1922.) So maybe they were catering to fringe listeners who could pull in the signal. But you're right. I can see why they might have included WJR-AM but listing their FM signal on the guide is kind of odd.   

What this also reminds us is that the Star - and other papers - used to have a large section with daily radio listings. These days, if radio even gets mentioned in a story, it's a noteworthy event.

You would have needed an incredible antenna if you lived in Toronto in 1958 to be able to listen to either CKOX Woodstock or CFJR Brockville since both operated on a power of only 250 watts. So Star circulation sales likely influenced the decision to include them in the radio listings.  CFJR did increase its power to 1000 watts in 1959.

 

Sat Mar 24 4:54 pm  #12


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

Ahhhh...Those were the days.  Still a few steam locomotives and more level crossings than one might imagine.  A huge break of undeveloped green space between Toronto and Thornhill...let alone further up Highway 11 to Richmond Hill...Uncle Byng on CJBC...Walter Bowles too.  The Everly Brothers and Elvis. Perry Como and Tommy Edwards.  The Champs, Conway Twitty, Ricky Nelson, Jimmy Clanton Bobby Day and Chuck Berry were all big then...but really?  Only On CHUM.  That would be See, Aytch, You, Emm by the way.  And I was doin' 'time' gettin' bored to death in school.

Radio was a dream then.  It all came true.  Then there's now.  Never had THIS specific nightmare.  Who knew?  [that nobody would know.]


The less 'Cyber Space' knows about me the better.  As a result I do not use my real name.  I would be willing to use yours' though.  No?  OK then.  So you 'get' it.  We're good.
 

Sat Mar 24 8:43 pm  #13


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

Chuck99 wrote:

Star circulation sales likely influenced the decision to include them in the radio listings.

I'm thinking this has to be the case. The same paper contained TV listings for 1958. Here are the channels they included:

2-WGR, Buffalo
2d-WJBK, Detroit
3-CKVR, Barrie
3s-WSYR, Syracuse
4-WBEN, Buffalo
4d-WWJ, Detroit
5-WROC, Rochester
5s-CKSO, Sudbury
6-CBLT, Toronto
6t-CFCL, Timmins
7-WCNY, Watertown, N.Y.
8-CKNX, Wingham
8s-WHEN, Syracuse
9-CKLW, Windsor
10-CFPL, London
10n-CKGN, North Bay
10r-WHEC, Rochester
10r-WVET, Rochester
(The Rochester outlets on Channel 10 were shared time stations.)
11-CHCH, Hamilton
11k-CKWS, Kingston
12-CHEX, Peterborough
12e-WICU, Erie
13-CKCO, Kitchener
17-WBUF, Buffalo


Clearly, no one in Toronto would be able to pull in the Detroit stations and Timmins, Sudbury and North Bay were way out of range. So the only logical conclusion for both their radio and TV listings must have been out of town circulation.

     Thread Starter
 

Sun Mar 25 10:18 am  #14


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

Don wrote:

RadioActive wrote:

-What was CKGR at 1110?

Oshawa. What's now CKDO, I think.
 

Oshawa was never CKGR.  It was in fact CKDO; which it has returned to today.  My old boss the late Gord Garrison changed it to CKLB.  LB for Lakeland Broadcasting.  George Grant then bought it and changed the call letters to CKAR. The POWER group; then bought it and changed it back to CKDO; which lives on today.  Then Corus bought it and finally Durham Radio; with owner Doug Kirk.  He now has three stations in Oshawa and I understand the country station KX96 does really, really well.

Last edited by John D (Sun Mar 25 10:22 am)

 

Sun Mar 25 11:31 am  #15


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

This was the era of Big City Canadian newspapers increasing their circulation numbers by going after "nearby" areas.  Listing local stations in those areas was a big part of it.

I don't have access to the Toronto Star from back then, but the Vancouver Sun produced multiple regional editions for different parts of British Columbia.  Typically, only a few pages differed in one of the "back sections" of the paper, including the radio and TV listings, as well, of course, as the front page Masthead, which already changed for each edition (e.g. FIVE STAR FINAL).

The Star had huge ambitions back then.  The Star Weekly was better known than Macleans in Vancouver when I was very young.  In fact, I didn't initially know it was published by the Toronto Star.  In my Vancouver suburb of East Burnaby, in the early 1960s, there was even a paperboy who sold and delivered the Star Weekly.

 

Sun Mar 25 12:54 pm  #16


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

I knew.  I had to deliver them.  Add that on to the load of daily papers and it made for a VERY heavy day...PLUS there was also the collecting for them.  Then came the Canadian Weekly insert on Saturdays...for free...and the Star Weekly became redundant and disappeared.  I guess that was the Star 'localizing'.  I think I delivered the Star for 3 1/2 years before switching over to the Globe and Mail when I started high school.  I played football.  Couldn't do that AND deliver afternoon papers.


The less 'Cyber Space' knows about me the better.  As a result I do not use my real name.  I would be willing to use yours' though.  No?  OK then.  So you 'get' it.  We're good.
 

Sun Mar 25 2:37 pm  #17


Re: The Toronto Radio Dial In 1958

CKGR 1110 broadcast from Galt, Ontario before it became part of Cambridge. The Star listing was innacurate because the 250 watt daytimer became CFTJ in 1956.

There were persistant rumours in the 1960s that CHLO in St.Thomas was going to change frequencies.  Ted Rogers wanted to move the struggling CHFI AM to 680.  After he got approval to move CHFI to 680 with a power of 10000 watts, CHLO started to experience interference in its coverage area from the Toronto station. CHLO eventually agreed to Rogers offer to pay them $400,000 to move to 1570.  After the switch, CHLO lost listeners in the western part of Elgin County because it was forced to aim its signal to the north to protect other stations using 1570.  I remember when I travelled east of St. Thomas in the 1980s, CHLO could not be heard past Alymer which was only 20 kms away.

Last edited by Chuck99 (Sun Mar 25 2:41 pm)